Facts You Didn’t Know About Donald Trump!

When Trump announced he was running for the presidency, a lot of people laughed, but as time went on, he gained actual support, and nobody’s laughing anymore. And of course, the man gets a ton of media exposure because of all the crazy things that he says. But nobody’s paying attention to all of the crazy things that he’s said and done in the past, and trust me, there’s a lot of them. So hey, since nobody’s talking about those things, let’s do that now, so, without further ado,

here are 10 Shocking Things You Didn’t Know About Donald Trump.

Number one is incestuous comments. Oh my god. Let’s kick everything off with some good, ol’ fashioned cringy incest. On March 6, 2006 Trump and his daughter Ivanka made a guest appearance on the talk show The View. They were there promoting his reality show, The Apprentice. But things turned real awkward when he was asked how he would feel about Ivanka appearing in an issue of Playboy, to which he replied he would be disappointed.. He suddenly went off on a tangent complimenting his daughter’s figure, saying: – Although, she does have a very nice figure, I’m saying that if Ivanka weren’t my daughter, perhaps I’d be dating her.

Number two are accusations of domestic abuse. This one’s more of a serious one. For those that don’t know the Donald has been married three separate times, for which I’m not going to judge him for, I mean, if you can’t find the right one, you can’t find the right one. But during a deposition made during their divorce proceedings his ex-wife, Ivana, accused Donald of assaulting her and even alleged that he once raped her. She claimed that he, then her husband, became enraged after a plastic surgeon, that she had recommended to remove a bald spot, botched the job and he violently assaulted her. Apparently, restraining her and tearing hair from her scalp. Her story was even backed up by friends of the family and to ensure discretion, part of her divorce settlement included a gag-order on talking about their marriage whatsoever. Just some food for thought, that’s the man that’s going to be holding the nuke launch codes. ‘Think about it.

Number three is he’s a huge wrestling fan. In case you couldn’t tell from his multiple appearances on Monday Night Raw, Trump is a huge wrestling fan, specifically a fan of the WWE. While not only has he hosted multiple events at his Trump Plaza, but one appearance actually had him in a rivalry role with the chairman of the WWE, Vince McMahon. They each bet on a wrestler, in an event called The Battle of the Billionaires, with the loser having to shave their head. Donald, unfortunately, ended up winning the bet and he and his chosen wrestler, Bobby Lashley, shaved McMahon’s head completely bald in front of a crowd at WrestleMania 23. Which, to me, I think Donald was the actual loser there, I mean, dude needs to start from scratch. But anyway, not only that, but the Donald actually showed off his own wrestling moves, clotheslining McMahon at one point in delivering a few blows of his own. I call this move The Wall, it’s my finishing move. It involves me yelling racial slurs while chopping you across the chest. Your fans are going to love it.

Number four is he ran for the presidency before. Yep. In October of 1999 Trump decided to run for the 2000 presidential elections under the U.S. Reform Party, meaning that he’s tried to be president before. He was actually given the idea by Minnesota governor, Jesse Ventura, at a wrestling match when Ventura convinced him to run for the Reform Party nomination. And unbelievably he even tried to get Oprah Winfrey to run as his Vice-President, to which she of course said no, because, uh, she’s sane. His campaign ran until February of 2000 when he decided to withdraw from the race because he felt that the Reform Party was flawed. Wow, isn’t that the pot calling the kettle black. He also called out several Reform Party members as Klansman, Neo-Nazis, and Communists, because you know, he’s a classy guy.

Number five is he’s never drank nor smoked. See, this one’s a shocker, because you probably think he’s drunk half the time based on the stuff that he says. Donald Trump has gone on record as claiming that he has never taken a drink of alcohol or smoked tobacco in his life. However, the reason behind this actually makes a lot of sense. His older brother, Fred Trump Jr. has had a lot of trouble with the alcohol abuse. Now, Fred Jr. never shared a love for the family business like his father and his brother, Donald, did. And, possibly due to the pressure, caused a major drinking problem. After watching alcoholism drive his brother to an early grave at only 43 years old. He vowed to not drink or smoke ever. Shockingly, in December of 2015, Trump’s lifetime of sobriety led his doctor to state, that he will be the healthiest individual ever elected as president. He’s never even tasted his own vodka. Alright, that is the only thing I respect Donald Trump for. I mean, like, we’re talking the smallest, minuscule, tiny little teaspoon, little, pinch amount of respect for that. Otherwise he’s a dick.

Number six is he’s a movie star. Where did you think he got the occasional ability to act like a decent person from? (snorts and laughs) Yes, Donald Trump has always been destined for the limelight. He’s appeared in multiple movies as either a supporting role or a main actor. In many of these films, he actually plays himself or a character strangely close to himself. But this isn’t some exaggeration. He’s starred in 23 different roles, in everything from Home Alone 2 to the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air to a music video by Bobby Brown, called On Our Own. He was also in Zoolander and, most recently, Saturday Night Live.

Number seven is he denies climate change. Yeah, you know, climate change, global warming, that thing that has up to a 97 percent consensus among climate scientists. Yeah, he denies that. On September 21st, 2015, just a year ago, Trump phoned in to a talk-radio show called, The Hugh Hewitt Show, to talk about his Republican nomination campaign. Hugh had asked Trump what his views were on climate change, and, of course, rising global temperatures, to which Hugh responded, “Not only does he not believe “climate change is real, but that there is no issue “to deal with and that it’s essentially a hoax.” He’s also stated that he won’t change his mind until someone can prove something to him. But, don’t worry. As he said, “I believe in weather.” That’s something a five year old would say. I believe in the weather, it’s raining. Mmm, it’s so nice out, mmmm.

Number eight is he went to military school. As it turns out, the Donald was a bit of a troublemaker in his teenage years. At the age of 13, because of behavioral issues, his parents yanked him out of his Queens, New York, middle-school and enrolled him in a New York military academy. He finished his middle-school education and the entirety of his high-school education in this school while also receiving military discipline training. But, in an awkward twist, he never ended up using his military training in the actual U.S. Army, because in 1968, during the draft for the Vietnam War, he purposely avoided his service duty five times.

Number nine is he’s a germaphobe. Let me get this straight, the guy who has to shake hands for a living, as the potential next President of the United States of America, doesn’t like shaking hands. Yeah, that shouldn’t cause any problems. Trump is a self-proclaimed clean hands freak, in that he hates even having to push elevator buttons because so many people have touched them. Presumably because, they’re probably poor people. I can’t touch the elevator doors, they’re dirty, they’re poor people, build a wall. He’s even been quoted as saying, “handshakes are the curse of American society.” He even goes as far as to eat his pizza and KFC with a knife and fork, to avoid getting stuff on his hands. Yeah, that’s totally something that the average blue-collar worker can connect with, right? Eating your KFC and pizza with a knife and fork? Maybe they’re platinum knife and forks, maybe he sprinkles diamonds over his food so that his dookie twinkles.

And number ten is Trump never intended to win. Perhaps the biggest shocker of all is, Donald Trump never actually intended to win the Republican nomination for presidency. Trump’s bid for presidency was actually more of a big marketing scheme to boost his celebrity profile. The team behind him, you know, all those campaign professionals, are actually a small mish-mash team of politically inexperienced men and women who Trump himself described as, “capable but not experienced.” He was actually quoted as saying, “When I first got into this it was for other reasons.” But as support for his unorthodox campaign grew he started considering the nomination more seriously and now he’s in the final round. Good luck America. So those were: 10 Shocking Things You Didn’t Know about Donald Trump.

Brain is a multidimensional organ that do its part as it responce

In 1861, a patient arrived at a Paris hospital saying the syllable Tan over and over again. His doctor, Paul Broca, found that the man could understand language without a problem; he just couldn’t say anything ” besides Tan. When the patient unexpectedly died a few days later, Broca dissected his brain and found a small bit of damage “ called a lesion “ on the left frontal lobe, leading him to conclude that this part of the brain must be responsible for speech generation. Back then, scientists had only recently accepted the idea that we think with our brains rather than our hearts, and some kinda mean experiments with animals had convinced them that different parts of the brain were dedicated to different mental jobs. Broca’s lesion method seemed like the way to draw up a localized map of brain activity in humans: doctors found patients with specific cognitive deficits and then matched those deficits up with the damaged parts of their brains.

From these patients, they deduced that new memories are formed in the hippocampus, fear comes from the amygdala, and that we recognize faces using the fusiform face area. However, there’s a big difference between correlating a certain part of the brain with a certain mental task and proving that that part of the brain actually does that task. And, sure enough, when we developed the fMRI machine in the 1990s, to track moment-to-moment changes in brain activity, the old localized map of brain activity quickly began to unravel. For one thing, huge swaths of the brain seem to activate every time the brain does anything at all, suggesting that even the most basic mental tasks require a coordinated effort. And it turns out that this coordination relies on a network of long-range communication fibers. In fact, damage to these fibers explained why some people with intact Broca’s areas couldn’t speak.

And, the communications network also explained why some people with broken Broca’s areas could speak, because the fibers proved able to rewire Broca’s tasks to other parts of the brain. But, just because a certain part of the brain lights up during a certain mental task doesn’t necessarily mean that brain part is doing something critical to that task. In other words, the MRI method of brain imaging turned out to have the same problem as the lesion method. Fortunately, we can get around this problem by putting the two methods together. Recently, researchers performed scans on 182 people with brain lesions “ mostly soldiers with shrapnel wounds “ and had them perform a battery of mental tasks. Then, they put all the scans together to see which brain parts were always active when the subjects could perform a task, and which parts were always turned off when they could not.

As a result, we now have a map of the brain that shows which parts work together to help us do brainy things like understand language, solve puzzles, and remember stuff. But even with these maps, our own brains still give us a lot to ponder. We may never, for example, why Broca’s patient could only say “Tan,” or whether there was something else he was trying to tell us. This video was sponsored by Audible.com, the leading provider of audiobooks, including Oliver Sacks’ œThe Man Who Mistook His Wife For a Hat, a fascinating collection of curious neurological cases like this one: For not only did Dr P. increasingly fail to see faces, but he saw faces when there were no faces to see: genially, Magoo-like, when in the street he might pat the heads of water hydrants and parking meters, taking these to be the heads of children Peruse Audible’s huge selection, and download a book of your choice, by going to www.audible.com/minuteearth and signing up for a free 30-day trial.

Capcom Announcement! — Good or bad?

If ever there was a game that one could play through entirely without becoming bored, that game is Code Veronica. The cinematic genius contained in Capcom’s masterpiece reaches heights rarely attained by videogames. The story was so engrossing, the suspense so real, and the action so compelling that many gamers found themselves unable to put down the controller until they had reached the end. Other titles in the Resident Evil series have been critically acclaimed as well, but none of them were as visually impressive as the Dreamcast’s own Code Veronica.

Blending exploration and puzzle solving with frantic shooting and gratuitous violence, Code Veronica pits players against the evil Tyrell Corporation and legions of the undead. Oh, and did we mention the monsters? Hollywood take note: The monsters in Code Veronica are among the most terrifying monsters ever created. Once upon a time, it appeared that Hollywood had taken note: George Romero was planning to bring this masterpiece to the big screen. Alas, red tape and studio delays caused the venerable director to quit the project.

Resident Evil might never make it to the big screen, but thanks to an announcement from Capcom, gamers will be able to relive the terror they felt when they first played Code Veronica. Capcom has announced that, in order to celebrate the fifth anniversary of the Biohazard series, it will be releasing Biohazard Code Veronica Complete (the Japanese name for Resident Evil: Code Veronica Complete) for the Dreamcast and the PlayStation2 in Japan on March 22, 2001. The game will be an enhanced version of Code Veronica, containing several new elements like new dialogue, events and graphics that weren’t in the original version.

Those are all the details we have so far about this new version of Code Veronica, but stay tuned to Sega Radar for more information on this breaking news as it develops.

A Year to Go to Xbox’s next big thing!

With roughly a year to launch of the Xbox, the real challenge now becomes fulfilling the promises of better hardware and a console “made by gamers, for gamers.” Here are the biggest hurdles and how things look to us:

By the time the Xbox launches, the Dreamcast will be the budget alternative with a bushel of great games, many with online gameplay. The PlayStation2 will undoubtedly be leading the market with a potent videogame/DVD player combo that will have sucked in the hardcore gamer, the wealthy gadget-obsessed and some of the curious mainstream.

The real concern for Microsoft is that the Xbox is little more than a PlayStation2.5. With a year head start, the PS2 will already have a strong library. Unless the Xbox can have some titles that will only appear on the Xbox, there is little reason for consumers to invest in yet another $300 DVD/game machine to play a version of Resident Evil with an X at the end of its name.

Microsoft has only announced publishers so far, with no games officially unveiled. But unless their first-party games are amazing and Halo is as good a game as it looks, it will be difficult to compete with Sony’s market share and Nintendo’s history of great titles. The outlook right now is fuzzy. We have heard rumors of great games, but if all Microsoft is going to have is Halo and hockey and formula 1 games to set it apart, then it could be in trouble.

Sony is given credit throughout the industry for its excellent marketing of the PlayStation. By cleverly putting demo units in discos and clubs, and by already having a high reputation among electronics concerns, Sony was able to transfer an image of cool to the PlayStation. Microsoft, however, is loathed by a small section of the tech community for its buggy, unstable operating system and bullying business practices.

Hardcore gamers probably have a milder opinion of Microsoft, thanks to some excellent hardware peripherals and good games like Age of Empires II, but few people think of it as some sort of cool company where fresh ideas flow like Evian. Marketing and clever advertising can change some people’s opinions, but Microsoft has a big challenge here.

The addition of big-name Japanese developers like Konami, CAPCOM and Namco is a necessity for the success of the console. The Japanese are the premier videogame makers in the world, and without their healthy support, the Xbox wouldn’t stand a chance.

Still, there is some concern about the depth and length of that support. The videogame industry is in a mild recession in Japan right now, and much of the profits of struggling companies are coming from software sales in the States. If the industry bounces back with a renewed (and more developer-friendly) Nintendo and a healthy PlayStation2, what motivation is there to continue to support the Xbox? Furthermore, the Japanese gamers and press are utterly indifferent to the Xbox, and the console will likely be a modest success there at best. If the Xbox slips to third place in the states, then there may be little reason for Japanese developers to continue to support it, further hastening its demise.

Despite these concerns, the Xbox has an equal but opposite danger: too much hype too soon. Given the tight-lipped nature of all current Xbox developers, Microsoft is doing a fine job of keeping everyone on the same page. Until the actual launch of the unit, Microsoft has to be careful to ladle out juicy scoops of information at the right times, feeding interested gamers rather than glutting them.

Next E3 will undoubtedly be one of the most important for the industry. Microsoft will need to show the final look of the Xbox by then, if not before, and will need to start showing playable code of great-looking games. Nintendo will be showing premier Gamecube footage, and second-generation PlayStation2 titles will be on the way. The Xbox needs to have a strong showing, but still have enough gas to get it through the slow summer months and the peak into the holiday season.

If it fails on any of these, Nintendo and Sony will likely hammer it with a combination of great, unique games and aggressive pricing. The PC will undoubtedly soon eclipse the power of the consoles, and some developers may return to the freedom of an open platform. If that happens, the Xbox will simply be a good idea whose time came and went pretty quickly.

Disney’s The Jungle Book for Gamecube is Good News

Disney’s The Jungle Book is another of Ubi Soft’s ongoing stream of cross-platform character-based titles, though instead of a standard roaming adventure or platformer, we’re being offered a fresh rhythm and dance game. The Jungle Book is being developed on five different platforms: PSOne, PlayStation2, PC, Gamecube and Game Boy Color.

Although The Jungle Book was originally a series of short stories penned by Brit imperialist oddball Rudyard Kipling in the 19th Century, most of us are familiar with the cast of characters from Disney’s movie (now, gasp, 30 years old). And with the funky characters of Baloo and King Louie, the license has coolness about it for every generation. Just about everyone can groove on down to “I Wanna Be Like You” without fear of ridicule.

Catherine Roy begins by explaining the Bare Necessities of the title (tee-hee). “In the game, players are asked to adjust their ears to the tempo of the music and input arrows on the beat in order to make the main character dance,” she explains. “The better a player inputs their moves, the better Mowgli dances. The focus of the game is on the rhythm, and the objective is to get your character to dance well.”

Roy admits that the whole dance-game concept is nothing new, but argues that The Jungle Book does bring a fresh angle to the genre: “The Jungle Book will be one of the first dance games to address the North American and European markets, and will be the first to be made accessible to kids. Our powerup system is something that hasn’t been seen before. It brings something new and original to the genre.”

Players adopt the role of young Mowgli, who swings through nine different environments, all of which will be available in the two-player Versus Mode. This offers players two very distinct play scenarios — Power-Up Confrontation and Dance Marathon. Roy clarifies, “Very different in style, these scenarios will allow players to choose the kind of confrontation they want to have, one where they really interact with one another and try to make each other fall by using powerups, and another where they just compare skill levels. In both scenarios, players will choose their difficulty level, their characters and their environments before competing against one another.”

The Dance Carpet can be used for the Sony consoles, enabling keen butt-shakers to actually dance themselves silly. Roy explains the peripheral: “It’s a controller, but instead of holding it in your hands and pressing the buttons with your fingers, you get to stand on it and press the buttons with your feet. As you input the arrows on the beat with your feet, you’ll actually find yourself dancing pretty soon.”

For those gamers more interested in The Jungle Book story than knocking their friends over on the Dance Carpet, the Story Mode may offer a little light relief. “The story mode is the heart of the game,” Roy enthuses. “This is where players will be able to relive the excitement of the movie and experience the Jungle Book adventure. It can either be played in single-player or in teamplay. The main difference is that in teamplay, players will be able to help each other to reach a common goal, as they can save each other’s mistakes.”

Roy divulged a snippet of information about the programming team that focused specifically on the PlayStation2 version of the game. “Our PlayStation2 engine is a port from our PC engine called Open Space. Nine programmers are dedicated to our PS2 engine under the direction of Nicolas Rioux. Previously he has been lead programmer on Speed Busters (PC) and Technical Manager on Speed Devils (Dreamcast). A lot of attention was put on the animations, as they are part of the heart of the game. We wanted to have the same level of quality that the customers are used to seeing in Disney movies. Twelve animators worked for five months to create all the in-game animations. And another team was in charge of the high-definition kinematics. And thanks to our new 3D engine, we were able to use skin deformation and multi-target morphing in the animations. The particle generator helped us do some cool special effects. You can also see procedural texturing in Baloo’s pond and the waterfall in the last level.”

Expect the Sony versions and Dance Carpet in stores in time for the holiday season. The Gamecube version might be a little farther off, but at least we know Nintendo’s new console will have at least one dance game. Doesn’t that make you feel better?

Hook-Ups – Gamelink 300 S-Video Cable

If you’ve ever wondered why S-Video is better than composite (and RF for that matter), the answer is simple — it separates brightness and color signals, and the result is less noise and bleeding between the two. Composite jams both signals together, which causes all sorts of horrible effects, like colors blending into each other at the edges and weird bumps and ridges on straight vertical and horizontal lines. Your TV shouldn’t have to suffer this ignominy.

So if your TV has S-Video input, you need an S-Video cable — we recommend it wholeheartedly for sharper, clearer images on screen. Monster’s cable, however, steps things up a notch. Although there are a ton of high-tech reasons why the Monster cable improves the picture, such as nitrogen-injected gas dielectric insulation to cut out internal and external interference, there are a couple of clever low-tech solutions here too. For example, the contacts have split tips, making them springy — so when you plug them in, they constantly exert pressure over the surface, so they simply fit better. More contact means a steadier signal and, therefore, a better picture.

The 24k gold contacts are precision machined for better conductivity and signal transfer — and they look cool. Too bad you have to plug ’em in and hide ’em. Aesthetics and ergonomics are a big concern. The 10-foot cable is thick and in a particularly jarring shade of blue — matching the PS2’s blue highlights perfectly — and the connectors at each end have a soft rubber thumb pad, a nice touch that makes insertion and retraction much more pleasant. It also makes the cable easy to find in the dark netherworld behind your TV.

In our test, on a Sony Wega and a Sharp 27″ — both with digital comb filter — the results were staggering. We expected an improvement, of course, but compared to Sony’s own cables, both composite and S-Video, there was simply no comparison. This is as close to a VGA-quality display as you’re likely to see on the PS2 right now — sharp edges, perfect detail and crisp, well-defined colors. Anyone, including certain otherwise unimpressible girlfriends, can see the difference immediately.

The games we tested included Smuggler’s Run, Tekken Tag Tournament and Ridge Racer V. Although there were distinct and brilliant improvements in each case, they were most noticeable on Smuggler’s Run, where distant objects (layers of hills and trees) showed clearly using Monster when they were simply invisible using the Sony composite cable.

There’s also a distinct (but less so) benefit to audio output — but really, you’ll want to go for digital optical for best results — and yes, you’ll need a decoder too. As it stands, the Monster S-Video cable represents the absolute state-of-the-art in video game cabling, and it’s very easy to recommend.